8 Baby Facts – You May Not Know

1. Babies will double in weight during their first five months of life. This is partly why eating and sleeping are so high in their priorities – and why they let you know about it! 2. Babies’ eyes are 75% their adult size when they’re born, and they’re normally very near sighted too for around 6 months. 3. Babies prefer female voices, and subconsciously adapt with age. This is potentially why people talk in high-pitched tones when around the little one. 4. Some babies will sleep with their eyes open. This can be quite disconcerting at first but absolutely nothing... Read more →

Smoking and Pregnancy

Smoking and Pregnancy – published by Bristol Post 19/06/15 MORE than 1 in 10 mothers who give birth in Bristol are still smokers at the time their baby is born, according to new statistics. The risks of lighting up while pregnant have been widely publicised, and cigarette consumption has been linked with miscarriage, premature birth, and low birth weights for babies. But shockingly, it has been suggested that some of the mums may be continuing to smoke deliberately because they fear the pain of delivering a large baby. In the NHS Bristol area last year, 6,480 women gave birth, and 721 of... Read more →

12 things to make the last few weeks of pregnancy easier

The last few weeks of your pregnancy are very special – but they can also be very stressful. Here are 12 things you can do to make these last few weeks of pregnancy easier. Deep clean. Whether you pay someone or call in a few favours – get your home in tiptop condition ready for the new arrival. There are areas that you won’t have the time to give much attention to during the first few weeks, and will appreciate them having been deep cleaned! Clean out your fridge. You’ll be stocking up so make sure you have places to put... Read more →

What are the side effects of being pregnant? Are they all bad? Can I actually enjoy some of them?

Pregnant… are all the side effects bad news? Sometimes, being pregnant isn’t all fun and games. You have a beach ball strapped to your stomach and which keeps on getting bigger. It’s becoming a struggle to even tie your shoelaces and you need to wee all the time. Stretch marks, morning sickness and being put off your favourite foods are amongst the side effects of carrying your little one, alongside the emotional outbursts and mood swings. It’s not all bad though, there are definitely upsides to being pregnant! Sure you’ll be feeling tired a lot of the time, but courtesy... Read more →

36 Weeks Pregnant; what’s going on..

At 36 Weeks Baby’s Growing By this point, your baby will be gaining weight – around 28g a day – and weight almost 6 pounds. Your little one will be more than 18 inches long and shedding most of the downy hair covering their body as well as the vernix caseosa (the waxy substance that covered and protected their skin). At 36 weeks your baby will be swallowing these two substances, with some reaching their bowel and becoming meconium – their first bowel movement. How you will feel at 36 weeks You may feel an increased pressure in your lower... Read more →

How big is my baby? – Baby Size

There are lots of different measurements that can be taken to determine baby size and here’s an explanation of some: The Crown-rump Length This measurement can be made between 7 to 13 weeks. The Crown-rump length (CRL) is the baby size measurement of the length of human embryos from the top of the head (crown) to the bottom of the buttocks (rump). This method of baby size is typically determined from ultrasound imagery, it can be used to estimate gestational age. Dating with the CRL can be within 3-4 days of the last menstrual period. Importantly, when the due date... Read more →

4D baby scan, Peek inside the womb.

4D Baby Scan, what will I see? When in the womb, the baby can’t drown because they don’t breathe air. The umbilical cord attaches the baby to the placenta, which itself it attached to the wall of the womb. The cord passes nutrients and oxygen to the baby, and removes waste products back to the mother’s system for elimination by her kidneys – she does all the breathing and eating for the baby. Physical protection comes from the flesh of the mother’s stomach and the fluid sac, both of which can deflect any soft impacts and many hard impacts away... Read more →

The UKs new rules of parental leave, and what this means for you!

The rules surrounding maternity leave (or paternity leave) can be difficult to understand. It is important to understand what you are entitled to after the birth of your child to allow you to have the best experience possible and to plan accordingly. In simple terms: Parents who both work have the right to take up to 50 weeks off (37 weeks of which is paid) after having a baby, or adopting a child. Mothers will continue to take the first two weeks, the compulsory part of maternity leave, and fathers will also still be entitled to two weeks of paternity... Read more →

Why it is harmful to smoke during pregnancy

When in the womb, the baby gets everything from its mother via the placenta and umbilical cord. This allows the transfer of vital nutrients and oxygen, but can also expose the baby to and toxins consumed by the mother. Smoking not only exposes the baby to toxins present in tobacco smoke, but can also affect placenta function by altering the blood’s ability to work in a normal and healthy manner – vital in the development of the baby. Sometimes there is sufficient damage to the placenta to be seen through an ultrasound scan. When a person smokes, in simple terms,... Read more →

Pregnancy ultrasound scans.

What is an ultrasound scan?  An ultrasound scan is a procedure that uses high frequency sound waves to create an image of the baby inside the womb. A sonographer will place a small handheld device (a transducer) onto your stomach, moving it around the area to be examined. To allow for the transducer to move more smoothly, a lubricating gel is used – which also ensures continuous contact between the sensor and the skin. Pulses of ultrasound are sent from the transducer through into your body, which then bounce back from different structures inside the womb creating ‘echoes’. The image... Read more →

The nub theory. The earliest most accurate way of finding out gender and how we do it at Window to the Womb.

In short, the nub theory suggests it is possible to tell the gender of your child from an ultrasound scan from as early as 12 weeks. It is supposedly the earliest point of prediction and one enabled by modern technology, however it is only 60/40% accurate. Here at Window to the Womb, this prediction regarding gender is done no earlier than the 16 weeks 3 day mark through an ultrasound scan by a qualified, experienced sonographer. Prior to this the baby will be smaller than a Mars bar and there will only be a small distinction between the two genders... Read more →

Week 24

Hi folks Week 24 this week. It has been the definition of a rollercoaster!! To start with at the weekend we got to see the little lady again…we took her big brother along for the first time he was so sweet! We got to see her face…i think she looks like her daddy he thinks she looks like me…personally id rather she looked like him he is a very handsome man!! As normal absolutely loved the visit i always feel so at home at WTTW and this time was no exception. Jordan has had man flu last week so i... Read more →

Sexing – Gender Scans – How to sex your baby

If you are pregnant or are thinking of getting pregnant and do NOT want to know the gender of your baby, you MUST NOT READ THIS ARTICLE. Go away. Read something else. Go on. Go!…. I’m waiting…. Seriously. You can’t read this…. Er… are you still there? No? Good. OK. Now, to the rest of you… For centuries, people have been claiming they can predict the gender of your baby whilst you are still pregnant. Some say that you’re having a boy if you’re carrying all out front or low and a girl if you’re carrying all around and high. Or there’s... Read more →

How do stem cells work

As the building blocks for all organs in the body, stem cells can be used in a growing number of medical treatments. Today, the list includes blood cancers, metabolic disorders, solid tumours, immune disorders and blood disorders. Tomorrow, current research is suggesting, we will be able use stem cells to treat a much larger range of conditions including brain damage, cancer, spinal cord injury, heart damage, faulty blood-cell formation (haematopoiesis), baldness, wound healing and infertility. About Haematopoietic and Mesenchymal stem cells In fact, there are three main types of stem cells in cord blood and tissue: • Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs),... Read more →